Military officials follow Mattis out the door

What’s going on at the Pentagon?

Following Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’ abrupt resignation late last month, other top military leaders have reportedly been forced out or resigned in the last few weeks.

Mattis resigned December 20, reportedly because he disagreed with President Trump about the president’s decision to pull American military forces out of Syria.

The special presidential envoy for the global coalition to counter ISIS, Brett McGurk, resigned two days later, reportedly because of the same concerns about the Syria decision.

On January 5, Pentagon chief of staff Kevin Sweeney was reportedly forced out of his post after working for the defense secretary for two years. “I’ve decided the time is right to return to the private sector. It has been an honor to serve again alongside the men and women of the Department of Defense,” he said in a short statement.

Sweeney was then followed three days later by retired general Anthony Zinni, the administration’s envoy for the Gulf region out of the State Department.

Retired General Anthony Zinni, the Trump administration’s envoy working to resolve diplomatic disputes in the Gulf region, has resigned from his role at the State Department. “I did not think my services were needed,” he said.

Sources at State told CNN that Zinni resigned “because he felt he had reached a dead-end, believing there was no forward movement on resolving the stalemate between Qatar and its Gulf neighbors. The sources claim Zinni did not depart because of bad blood with other administration officials. Zinni confirmed in an email to CNN that the sources’ characterizations of his departure were correct.”
The Trump administration is bleeding foreign policy experience. Where will it end?

President Trump panned by GOP commentators for national address

Republican strategist Alice Stewart, a former strategist and spokesperson for Ted Cruz and Mike Huckabee, had some critical words for Trump’s national address on the partial government shutdown.

Stewart said she thinks the whole national address should be done on radio because:

“Neither one of them [Trump, Schumer, and Pelosi] came across in a positive light optically. While the desk is very presidential, that’s not his strength.”

President Trump in fact seemed to not want to go this route, with the New York Times reporting that he didn’t think he should give the prime-time Oval Office address and that he said privately his trip to the southern border was a waste of time.
Ann Coulter also ripped him for the trip to McAllen, Texas, calling the visit to the border “beyond moronic.”

Steyer too timid for presidential run

Tom Steyer has been talking a big game over the past few years. In October 2017, he launched “Need to Impeach”, an organization that claims to be committed to impeaching the president, though the group offers no explanation for how they intend to do so given that private citizens with a grudge can’t actually impeach a sitting president.

Through Need to Impeach, Steyer has been on a swing from Iowa to New Hampshire and back again over the last few months, leading many to speculate that he was considering a presidential run to finally put his values toe-to-toe with Trump’s.

I guess he decided his plan for our country wouldn’t hold up to scrutiny, because Steyer announced this week that he won’t run for president in 2020.

“Most people come to Iowa around this time to announce a campaign for president,” Steyer said in Iowa. “But I am proud to be here to announce that I will do whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, to remove a president.”

That’s right: A man too scared to put together his own campaign is instead investing $40 million in a futile fight to get Trump out of office. That’s $40 million you’ll never see again, Tom.

Bye, Paul Ryan: Thanks for nothing on the border wall

There’s little to be happy about as the Pelosi Democrats take over Congress and begin to pursue their radical liberal agenda, but at least there’s an upside: Paul Ryan isn’t around anymore.

The former speaker left office with a dismal approval rating of 12%, according to the polling firm Civiqs. That number improved only slightly when polling only Republicans; 24% of Republicans approve of Ryan’s performance.

Maybe it’s because Ryan lied repeatedly and voluminously about the border wall.

President Trump spent his presidential campaign telling voters that he would build a border wall, and that Mexico would pay for it.

Initially, things looked good. In January of 2017, Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell promised to pass up to $15 billion for the Trump wall. But Ryan didn’t include the funding in any actual budget proposals until Trump threatened to shut down the government because of it.

Even in those dire circumstances, Ryan put forth legislation that only allocated a measly $5 billion to the border wall.

Wondering why no one will miss you, Paul? A series of broken promises and an invisible wall. Thanks for nothing.

Liberals try to ditch the Electoral College

Liberals have once again decided that the rules of our democracy shouldn’t apply to them . Last week, Congressman Steve Cohen (TN-09), a senior member of the House Judiciary Committee, introduced a Constitutional Amendment that would eliminate the Electoral College altogether.

Per a press release from Congressman Cohen’s office:

“In two presidential elections since 2000, including the most recent one in which Hillary Clinton won 2.8 million more votes than her opponent, the winner of the popular vote did not win the election because of the distorting effect of the outdated Electoral College. Americans expect and deserve the winner of the popular vote to win office. More than a century ago, we amended our Constitution to provide for the direct election of U.S. Senators. It is past time to directly elect our President and Vice President.”

It’s a long way of saying what Democrats have been dancing around for years: That they believe the coastal elites in cities like Los Angeles and New York City should be able to elect presidents without the input of the rest of the country.

Can you imagine a country run the way New York City is run? It would be chaos. We’re sorry that you’re sick of losing, libs, but that’s no excuse to ditch our founding documents.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Trump ribbed over fast food feast for football champs

President Trump hosted the Clemson University football team at the White House after their national championship victory and served fast food, earning widespread criticism.

One of those critics was Trump’s own advisor Kellyanne Conway’s husband, George, a conservative lawyer who frequently criticizes Trump. Check out the tweet:

Ouch!

Efforts to use the shutdown to show the ineffectiveness of government are backfiring

An anonymous op-ed in the Daily Caller from a senior White House official revealed an uncomfortable truth: this government shutdown may not actually be about the wall but about radically trying to gut government. While we’re all about smaller government, this seems like a bit of dicey way to go about it, especially given the shock to the economy and the troubling stories of people hawking cherished family heirlooms and rationing insulin to get by without a paycheck.

Some have suggested that the shutdown will demonstrate just how little government matters to people, this is all about the swamp and we came to drain that sucker anyway, right? The issues is that people all over the country earn their living through the federal government and it’s not just in the increasingly-very-blue Washington, D.C. region.

The Pew Research Center found that Democratic and Republican legislators are just as likely to have federal employees in their states and districts.

When the government was first shut down a month ago, hundreds of thousands of workers were furloughed, sent home and told not to work. But 450,000 of them,  including Secret Service agents, Coast Guard personnel, TSA agents, air traffic controllers, and more, were forced to keep working, all without the promise of a paycheck.

Plus, just this week, Trump recalled another 50,000 workers back to the office, including at the IRS as tax season heats up.

If half a million people are so imperative that they have to work—even without pay—it undermines the argument that they’re not performing a vital service.

Hard to have it both ways.

Google swayed votes in 2018 election, says expert

We will never get over how the very same liberals who claim to care about online advertising influencing voters in 2016 don’t seem to have a problem with the same thing happening in 2018, so long as the voters swung their way.

Last week, research psychologist Robert Epstein joined Tucker Carlson to discuss the impact of Google searches on the 2018 midterms, in which Democrats picked up dozens of seats in the House.

Epstein revealed that Google could use search suggestions to subtly influence voters toward one candidate or the other, and could have affected anywhere between 800,000 and 4.6 million votes in November.

Were they shifting people toward Conservative candidates? Somehow…we suspect not.

Horrifying: Dead baby found in Amazon trash bin

Reports surfaced this week that a dead infant had been found in a women’s restroom of an Amazon warehouse in Phoenix, Arizona. The infant was already beyond resuscitation when it was found in the trash receptacle in the bathroom, which EMTs confirmed upon arrival.

Police have since located the baby’s mother.

In a statement, an Amazon spokesman said the following:

“This is a terribly sad and tragic incident. We are working with local authorities to support their investigation. The safety and wellness of our team is our top priority.”

This is the latest in a string of horrifying scenes from Amazon warehouses, where employees have reported exhaustion and unattended injuries among other hard working conditions.

Meanwhile, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos remains one of the wealthiest men in the world.

Military officials follow Mattis out the door

What’s going on at the Pentagon?

Following Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’ abrupt resignation late last month, other top military leaders have reportedly been forced out or resigned in the last few weeks.

Mattis resigned December 20, reportedly because he disagreed with President Trump about the president’s decision to pull American military forces out of Syria.

The special presidential envoy for the global coalition to counter ISIS, Brett McGurk, resigned two days later, reportedly because of the same concerns about the Syria decision.

On January 5, Pentagon chief of staff Kevin Sweeney was reportedly forced out of his post after working for the defense secretary for two years. “I’ve decided the time is right to return to the private sector. It has been an honor to serve again alongside the men and women of the Department of Defense,” he said in a short statement.

Sweeney was then followed three days later by retired general Anthony Zinni, the administration’s envoy for the Gulf region out of the State Department.

Retired General Anthony Zinni, the Trump administration’s envoy working to resolve diplomatic disputes in the Gulf region, has resigned from his role at the State Department. “I did not think my services were needed,” he said.

Sources at State told CNN that Zinni resigned “because he felt he had reached a dead-end, believing there was no forward movement on resolving the stalemate between Qatar and its Gulf neighbors. The sources claim Zinni did not depart because of bad blood with other administration officials. Zinni confirmed in an email to CNN that the sources’ characterizations of his departure were correct.”

The Trump administration is bleeding foreign policy experience. Where will it end?